Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – It’s A Wonderful World.

This week, Amy is thinking about the song “What A Wonderful World” and has carried it through as the theme for the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge. I agree! It is a wonderful world and nowhere do I feel that more than when I’m outside among the flowers and wildlife in the garden. Everything has been blooming beautifully so far this year and it certainly is gratifying to see some positive results after all the hard work. The peonies have come and gone but they were spectacular while they lasted.

Also gone, for now, are the irises. They really put on a splendid show this year. So many different colors, it was hard to choose a favorite. It looks like I’ll be able to put quite a few out for anyone to help themselves, when I divide them later this year, as I do with the daylilies and other perennials. What I don’t appreciate is people coming into my garden uninvited and pulling up armfuls of plants as I saw one woman doing while I was walking home one day with my youngest granddaughter asleep in her stroller. I was too far away to remonstrate otherwise I would have given this audacious plant pincher an earful. Of all the nerve!!

Caught in the act! A baby bunny eating the nigella plants. No worries! There’s plenty to go around. Nigella reseeds (isn’t nature wonderful?) and comes up again without any help from me, although I do collect some of the seeds to scatter in other parts of the garden. It’s a pretty little flower and even the seed pods are quite decorative.

The possum re-appeared, and a tree in a neighbor’s backyard across the street disappeared. We have lost so many of the large trees in our area over the past several years due to diseases of one kind or another. The Village has replaced many of them on the parkway but it will be a while before they are large enough to provide much shade or attract any of the larger birds like the hawk or the flicker. It’s wonderful how they seem to return to the same places to nest and raise their young and I’m sure there will be a few of our feathered friends that will miss this one-time home.

Poppies added a blaze of color to the garden and the white ones brightened up any shady areas. This is probably when the garden is at its most colorful, with poppies, irises and peonies all blooming at the same time, and we very often see people stopping by to take pictures which is fine by me. I’m out there with the camera myself most days.

The birds have been busy in the garden too. the goldfinches making good use of some nesting material provided while a hawk stops by in search of a quick snack.

After some much-needed rain last night, the garden is refreshed and ready to produce the next lot of blooms which will include daylilies, oriental lilies, coneflowers and phlox among others. We live on a corner lot so every part of the garden is visible from the sidewalk and it’s nice to take a break once in a while and chat to passing pedestrians. I also love it when the little group from the local daycare walk by and wave, with the occasional tiny voice piping up “Hello!” as they go past. They are our future and I hope they will grow up to appreciate nature and perhaps share the interest in gardening that I have enjoyed for so many years. It truly is a Wonderful World.

44 thoughts on “Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – It’s A Wonderful World.

  1. What a joy to see all the beautiful flowers in your garden. They are all indeed wonderful with their bright colours and different shapes. The iris, peonies and poppies are all stunning and understandable why people ‘stand and stare’ at your garden. It must bring great pleasure to so many who live around you . I wish I lived near you to see when you are sharing out your plants- I’d be there with a wheelbarrow! Thank you for sharing your photos.

    • Many thanks for your kind comment, Marianne. I think one of the greatest pleasures that I’ve derived from gardening has been sharing the plants at the end of the year and later having total strangers come up and tell me how well their take-aways are doing. It’s always good to know when transplants have been successful.

    • Thank you, Anne! Seeing the garden growing and blossoming has been one of my greatest pleasures and I’m so happy that photography (another one of my many hobbies) has allowed me to share the results with my friends at WordPress.

  2. Ah…these abundant, colorful, beautiful peonies, iris, and poppies… are all from your gardens! How lucky to be your neighbors. But, I can’t believe someone would come and cut flowers from your yard! I tried to grow peonies many years ago. I had only two, three blooms years later and never did come back. Thank you so much for sharing your beautiful world, Sue.
    I remember you posted a story of your backyard some months ago when they were working on the pipeline.

    • Thank you, Amy! A couple of tips I learned about growing peonies were; don’t plant them too deep and be patient. Sometimes it takes several years for them to really start blooming. The garden is gradually making a comeback after all the pipeline upheaval and the new plants are starting to fill in the gaps.

  3. Wow! This is the first time I’ve seen a wide angle shot of your garden. How beautiful! Your neighbors are certainly lucky to have you on the corner graciously sharing your gift for gardening.

  4. Your garden is absolutely incredible Sue – and your images capture it beautifully. Cannot believe your story of the woman stealing your plants! Can you imagine?! A great example of the beauty of nature in this wonderful world. Amazing.

    • Thank you, Tina! I must admit I was stunned when I saw that person get out of her car, walk into the garden, help herself and drive off. I usually put a sign in the garden when I have plants to share, but she must have assumed that it meant ‘come in anytime and take whatever you want.’ Oh well. I hope she gave them a good home.

  5. had no idea that you were a master gardener – and it would bother me if someone helped themself to some plants – and sorry you have to deal with that

    in the 1990s – we had someone cut off most of the tulips out front one spring. Just small patch of them were there
    I did not mind because I think it was the former homeowner – or she sent someone to get them for her – and so to me – they belonged to her.
    she had lived in the house for 40 years and the first two years of living there had so many plant surprises – sadly she did not leave instructions or a map of what was where – and sad I killed half of the rose shrubs before I understood what they needed – and because of that forced on my experience I will not grow roses to this day –
    anyhow, your garden photos did show what a wonderful and colorful world we have.
    the goldfish and hawk were nice closing photos with your garden shots

    • Interesting tulip tale! I see your point about the former owner wanting a reminder of her garden. I would probably feel the same way, although I think I might have asked first before cutting the flowers. There was very little here in our garden when we moved in 30 years ago other than yew trees which we took out, and climbing roses that we left in. Since then, I’ve kept a map of everything that I’ve planted which has been really useful. Thank you so much for stopping by and for your comment

      • Hi -the map you keep is such a good idea!
        and regarding the tulip cuttings – I think they should have asked first – but I am still only thinking it was ruth or someone cut them for her.. It could have been a neighbor – or someone driving by and cut them on a whim.
        __

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