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Art and Autumn at the Arboretum

Just in time, we were able to catch the last few days of this year’s sculpture exhibition, Origami in the Garden, at the Morton Arboretum last month. These beautiful metal sculptures, created by Kevin and Jennifer Box, are modelled after the art of Origami or paper folding and the Arboretum was the perfect backdrop for this amazing artwork.

 

Not only did we get to enjoy the art but also some nice autumn scenery, even if the colors weren’t as vibrant this year.

In order to replicate the Origami creations, each sculpture goes through a 35-step, 12-week process of casting in bronze, aluminum or steel.

The turtles are real, but the raptor is another of Kevin Box’s clever creations.

This piece, entitled Double Happiness, shows a pair of nesting cranes which often appear in art as the symbol of companionship and happiness in marriage.

These intricately designed birds appear to be flying away from Meadow Lake.

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Weekly Photo Challenge – Rounded at the Lizzadro

It wasn’t until fairly recently that we discovered the Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art in Elmhurst. I’d heard it referred to as The Lizzadro and for years thought it was something to do with reptiles, which tells you how great my spelling skills are! Anyway, we were pleasantly surprised by the beautiful collection of stones, fossils and artwork that we found there.  And looking over some of the pictures that I captured, it seemed like there were a few that might work for the Weekly Photo Challenge set for us this week by Ben Huberman. Rounded is the subject and here’s my take on it.

Iris Agate from Brazil (with the backlighting.)

Pyrite Sun from Sparta, Illinois.

Triassic Ammonite from England.

Ammolite is a rare iridescent fossil formed from ammonite and can only be found in Southern Alberta, Canada.

Obicular Granite from Western Australia (2.5 billion years old.)

‘The Three Fates’ by Richard Hahn. A cameo made from multi-layered Agate.

A cameo Agate snuff bottle.

If you’re in the Elmhurst area of Illinois, I can highly recommend a visit to the Lizzadro Museum of Lapidary Art.

For more on The Weekly Photo Challenge go to Rounded

A Hidden Gem in Marion

During our visit to Marion, Illinois, a couple of weeks ago we decided to take a chance and visit a place called Mandala Gardens.  I had read a brief review of the Gardens on TripAdvisor which sounded promising but the Mandala Gardens website itself mentioned something about calling ahead, and like many of the side-trips that we make, this one was rather spontaneous.  When we got to the privately owned Gardens early in the morning the gates were closed and I gazed longingly through the bars at what looked like an intriguing vista. I was just about to get back in the car when a lady came out of the adjoining house and walked down to greet us.  I explained that our visit was rather a last-minute idea and were sorry to turn up unannounced but she told us that it wasn’t a problem and ushered us in.

You immediately feel the peace and serenity that emanates from this tranquil setting.  Diana Tigerlily (pictured below) and her husband Greg Reid have lived at the property on North State Street for 20 years and during that time have put a lot of effort into making it the lovely place that it is today. Diana kindly allowed us to wander around and enjoy the Gardens and of course I made the most of this great photo opportunity.  For more on Diana and Greg’s story go to ABOUT

There are several interesting structures to explore at the Gardens one of which is The Infinity Arch created by Thea Alvin.

Another feature, also created by Thea Alvin, is Moongate which stands at the end of the pond. Here at the Gardens Diana holds Yoga practice sessions which are named Blue Heron Yoga and just as I was about to walk around the pond the blue heron, for which these sessions are named, flapped lazily away. Unfortunately I wasn’t quick enough to get a shot with the camera but luckily the pond and Moongate were still there.

Looking through Moongate you catch a glimpse of the sandstone labyrinth, a quiet place to meditate, or take a walk through the trees just beyond and return to the garden via the bridge. Both the labyrinth and the bridge are the result of Greg and Diana’s hard work.

 

Back among the flowers, there are plenty of places to sit and enjoy the various pieces of artwork than can be found at Mandala Gardens, including Talisman, a metal sculpture by Carey Netherton and some delightful little stained-glass windows which are part of the potting shed.

If you are ever in the Marion area of Illinois, I can highly recommend a visit to Manadala Gardens.  Diana was most welcoming and made us feel right at home.

One Word Photo Challenge – Elephant

We’re out looking for elephants for the One Word Photo Challenge set for us by Jennifer Nichole Wells. They’re not easy to find these days, at least not in our neck of the woods. I can’t remember the last time I saw a real live elephant. There hasn’t been one at Brookfield Zoo in who knows how long, although when I spoke to someone who works there, last year, she did say that they were hoping eventually to bring them back to the zoo if and when funds permit.

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One of the last elephants to reside at Brookfield Zoo in Illinois.  I can still remember going for elephant rides at the London Zoo when I was a kid and watching the elephants at the circus, neither of which you can do now, which in some respects, especially from the viewpoint of the elephants, is a good thing. I don’t think I’ll ever be lucky enough to see elephants in their natural surroundings.

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Instead, I must look elsewhere for suitable images, such as these beautifully carved elephant heads at the BAPS Swaminarayan Mandir in Bartlett, Illinois.

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And this statue of an elephant in Irwin Gardens, Columbus, Indiana.

For more on Jennifer’s One Word Photo Challenge go to https://jennifernicholewells.com/2017/02/14/one-word-photo-challenge-elephant/

Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge – Flights of Fancy

This week, Cee invites us to post images of sculptures, statues or carvings for her Black & White Photo Challenge.  I have quite a large number of statues etc. in the photo files but after my recent post about the hawk I thought I would share some rather more light-hearted pictures of birds.

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When, even as a young child, a feather on a pillow would give me screaming fits, I find I can tolerate being close to these kinds of birds; sculptures. This piece, entitled Stork-like Bird, made of wood, steel and copper, was sculpted by Thomas Hill.

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This display of avian art was captured indoors and outside in the gardens at the Lee Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wausau, Wisconsin, last year.

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The Dance, sculpted by Donna Dodson and Andy Moerlein, uses saplings and plastic bags to recreate two giant sandhill cranes, a real flight of fancy, while the diminutive Common Redpoll, carved by Josh Guge, is life-like in every detail.

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For more on Cee’s Black and White Photo Challenge go to https://ceenphotography.com/2017/01/12/cees-black-white-photo-challenge-sculptures-statues-carvings-2/

Nature of the Dance – Men’s Fancy and Northern Traditional

I would like to share a few more images taken at the American Indian Center’s 63rd Annual Chicago Powwow.  The costumes and dances were of particular interest to me and luckily the weather was perfect for bringing out all the colors on display.

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One of the categories in competition dancing is Fancy.  The dance originated in Oklahoma and requires considerable agility and endurance. The costumes certainly live up to the name, being extremely elaborate with feathers, ribbons, bells and all kinds of brightly-colored accoutrements. It is said that the dance may represent warriors preparing for battle.

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Although not quite so flamboyant, the costumes worn for the Men’s Northern Traditional dance are still considerably ornamented and are most impressive. The costume may include an Eagle feather bustle, bone bead breastplate, leggings, beaded moccasins and ankle bells. The dancer sometimes carries an Eagle feather fan, pipe bag or dance stick and paints his face to represent a traditional family or national emblem.

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There are several different interpretations of the dance which is thought to either represent a warrior recounting his feats in battle or searching for his enemy while other stories mention a hunting or gathering role. Some of these dancers look quite fearsome so I’m guessing it has more to do with the fighting aspect.

 

 

Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge – Yellows

There was no shortage of images featuring yellow for Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge this week.  Like red, yellow usually shows up well in pictures and I’m always on the lookout for bright colors.

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These cheeky sunflower faces caught my eye at Goebbert’s Pumpkin Farm in South Barrington the other day.

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We visited the Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum in Wausau last week to see their ‘Birds in Art’ exhibit.  This beautiful piece, entitled ‘Lesser Bird-of-Paradise’ (Oil on tupelo), was created by Gary Eigenberger.

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Maybe not quite so artistic but very creative, this pumpkin was decorated for the Scarecrow Trail at Morton Arboretum in Lisle last year.

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Trees showing off their autumn finery at River Trails in Northbrook, Illinois.

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Splendid yellow costumes worn by participants in the American Indian Powwow in Busse Woods this September.

For more on Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge go to https://ceenphotography.com/2016/10/11/cees-fun-foto-challenge-yellows/