Tag Archive | flowers

Spring Things

Despite the fact that the weather has been freezing one minute and tropical in nature the next, I did manage to capture some Spring things in the garden with the camera. Because of all the rain, everything is looking very lush and green with flowers bursting out all over.

In fact, everything has been growing so well that even the rabbit can’t keep up. We have had what amounts to a bunny explosion here, of late, but thankfully there have been enough weeds to keep them occupied while my lilies and other tasty bits have continued to flourish unmolested.

On the butterfly front, We had a disappointing outcome to the dozen or so Swallowtail pupa that we kept overwinter, when all but one produced nothing but very mean looking parasitic wasps which were evidently the result of the parent wasp laying its eggs in the caterpillars in the fall. I had all but given up hope when the final Swallowtail emerged from its papery parcel and, after sufficient time to dry off, was released it into the garden. What happened to it after that, I cannot say, but it reminds me of a little anecdote regarding a moth.

When our daughter and her husband lived in Texas they spotted a moth that had fallen into the swimming pool.  It was making a gallant effort to extricate itself without much success.  They were fully clothed at the time (the kids, not the moth) so they couldn’t dive in to assist it but being the tender-hearted people that they are, they searched for the net that was used to scoop out unwanted debris and after much faffing about, finally managed to haul the moth in and laid it gently on the deck to dry whereupon a bird promptly flew down and ate it.

I hope our Swallowtail managed to survive at least long enough to have a look around. We have caught fleeting glimpses of other butterflies  in the garden and received a more prolonged visit from a monarch that appeared to be enjoying the chives by the back door as did a rather large bee which put up with me sticking the camera in its face for only so long before it became irate and chased me off.

Usually at our house, at this time of year, you’ll hear the cry go up, “Ducks are in!”  For nearly thirty years, we have played host to passing mallard ducks that are making their way to the pond at our local park. They’ll return several times and one year they even made a nest behind one of our shrubs. Unfortunately something ate the eggs, but the following year they returned, this time with ducklings in tow. They appear to feel right at home, helping themselves to the bird seed that I put out, sometimes marching up and down on the roof or paddling in the little ground-level birdbath.  They normally arrive first thing in the morning and twice this week I’ve looked out of the window and seen them actually standing on the door mat. They’ll be knocking on the door next.

Strangely enough, ducks are one of the very few species of bird of which I am not afraid. I can’t explain it other than the fact that they don’t do a lot of fluttering, which accounts for the clarity of these pictures as I was standing outside right next to them, rather than taking a hazy shot through a window which is how I get a lot of my bird pictures.

However, it was a different story with this baby robin. The neighborhood probably heard me scream when, going around the garden with the camera and taking pictures of the flowers, I realized that I was within touching distance of this little guy who just sat there looking puzzled as I shrieked and fell backwards into the irises. I ran back into the house to get a longer lens and took this picture from a safe distance.

 

Lens Artists Photo Challenge – Delicate Colors

This week, Ann-Christine is looking for Delicate Colors for the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge. Spring seems to have raced past us at an alarming rate and didn’t really feel like spring at all to me, probably because I missed a couple of the usual spring-time rituals like visiting the daffodils at Morton Arboretum and the lilac festival at Lilacia Park in Lombard. The first picture was taken there last year.

Like many others, I am anxiously awaiting the re-opening of the Chicago Botanic Garden. The palette of colors at the Garden includes everything from delicate pastels to vibrant hues some of which can be found in the annual butterfly exhibit. I’m looking forward to seeing the hummingbirds too, although from a safe distance. (this not because of social distancing but because I am terrified of birds at close quarters.)

After all the rain, the sun finally brought out the flowers on the tree peony in our garden. This event is something that the whole neighborhood seems to enjoy, judging by some of the comments coming from passers-bye. Its delicate colors and heady perfume are something I look forward to every year and it certainly didn’t disappoint, maybe because I gave it some extra words of encouragement.

Thank you to everyone who participated in the Challenge last week and for all your comments. I really enjoyed reading all about your pastimes and seeing the accompanying pictures.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Cropping The Shot

This week, Patti suggests that we try Cropping the Shot for the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge.  One of the most useful tools in the image-processing arsenal is the cropping tool.  I can’t tell you how many shots I rescued from the trash with a little judicial cropping.

I can even ‘zoom in’ by the simple expedient of the cropping tool, giving me a closer look at something way off in the distance, as I did with this shot taken at Arches National Park in Utah.

And if I’m really lucky I can get four shots for the price of one with the aid of the cropping tool, as I did with this image that was captured along Lake Shore Drive in downtown Chicago, each picture focusing on a different aspect of the overall scene; the more leisurely pace of the bike path, the hustle and bustle of the traffic on the Drive and the work going on aloft.

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Morning

This week, Ann-Christine has chosen Morning as the subject for the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge.  Things have settled down into a fairly dull routine here which is why I’m looking forward to being able to get out and about again. The Chicago Botanic Garden is probably the first place I’ll visit once the lockdown is eventually lifted and it’s reasonably safe to venture out, preferably first thing in the morning before the crowds get there. I have a feeling there will be quite a few of us with the same idea. Have a good morning and stay safe, everyone.

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Simplicity

This week, Patti has chosen Simplicity as the topic for the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge. Where I would normally, at this time of year, be enjoying lawns studded with colorful crocus at the Chicago Botanic Garden or photographing woods glowing with golden daffodils at the Morton Arboretum, I am now content with a few simple flowers in my own garden. They bring an enormous amount of pleasure at a point when even the sight of a bee going about its everyday business makes me want to jump up and down with joy.

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Chaos

Ann-Christine has certainly given us something to think about this week with her choice of subject for the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge. Out of chaos comes the promise of Spring. It’s not much, but it gives us hope for the future. Like the flowers, may we rise again from the grip of winter and the troubles that beset this poor old world of ours. Stay safe, everyone. Better days ahead.

 

 

 

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge – Change Of Perspective

This week, Patti is asking us to Change Our Perspective for the Lens-Artists Photo Challenge. I spent much of the time on Friday on my knees at the Chicago Botanic Garden, photographing flowers at the annual Orchid Show. This was my second visit, the first being on the previous Sunday when there were crowds of people and not much room to maneuver. It was a different story on Friday afternoon when there were times that I had the place almost to myself. When I wasn’t crouching down, I was looking up or twisting round and performing all kinds of contortions in order to get a different view of the blooms on show.

It’s not always easy to separate flowers from the surrounding foliage and sometimes it’s necessary to get into some rather undignified postures just to get the right angle.

 

They change the theme of the show every year and this time it was all about color and light, with some intriguing installations to highlight the displays. This one with the mirrored globes provided an interesting view of the orchids from different perspectives.

And another, with various colored strings that caught the rays of the sun through the greenhouse windows, provided ample opportunity to view the flowers in a whole different light.

While the towering chandelier, although not the easiest thing to access, still offered a variety of angles that resulted in a few interesting shots.

I always feel like a kid in a candy store as I’m taking in the sights at the show. There are just so many delightful blooms to reward the effort of a few somewhat uncomfortable moments of trying to get up from a kneeling position. The ends justify the means in this case.